The Case History of Everyman

doctor-visit

Let’s call him John Doe. John is a real patient and this is a real case history; however, this scenario could apply to any man. John came in about eight months ago for a “wellness check-up.” His affect made it clear that he really didn’t want to be there. His mind was on the golf course, or worse yet, on his overwhelmingly stressful job. It was an act of love that his wife made him come in, mentally kicking and screaming the entire way. It was also an act of reciprocal love that he consented to make the journey. After all, what was the big deal? A few extra pounds around the middle is just a part of growing older. OK, he was getting a bit more irritable, but it was certainly the job that was making him so fatigued. He figured that his mild erectile dysfunction was probably due to stress.

Of course it worried him a bit that he had heart disease in the family, and he was starting to accumulate quite a few risk factors himself. As it turned out his “wellness check up- up” revealed that he wasn’t so well after all. In fact he was careening down the road to ruin with a faint vision of an imminent crash in sight in the form of diabetes, heart attack, and/ or stroke. Until we got his labs back, we didn’t fully appreciate how dire things really were.

His triglycerides were through the roof. His cholesterols were elevated with lots of the bad kind. The good kind was barely to be found. His C-reactive protein, a sensitive measure of inflammation and an excellent predictor of heart disease, was also sky high. His testosterone was i n the basement. His vitamin D was tanked with serious implications for his immune function and cardiac function. We tested his overall nutritional function and found numerous other deficiencies. If all this was n’t bad enough, his blood sugar was elevated and he met the criteria for metabolic syndrome, a complex metabolic condition which portends heart disease, diabetes, and stroke.

Fortunately, the labs got his attention when his wife and I had failed. They painted an undeniable picture of pending catastrophe. Life had a bullet with his name on it, heading straight for his heart. He realized that he was at a cross roads in his life. The age old cardinal sins of gluttony and sloth, along with the modern day curse of unrelenting stress were taking its toll. It also didn’t help that he was an unwitting victim of the modern American diet (MAD diet) and ubiquitous environmental toxins. John Doe realized that he had a choice, as most of us do. He could continue on the same path destined to result in misery and premature death, or he could turn his life around and travel down the path of wellness and vibrant living.

The first and most important step in this process is the mindful realization of the problem. Instead, the insidious slippery slope of illness stealthily stalks us day by day. Most of us never see it coming until the heart attack hits us. Men in particular live in a perpetual state of denial. Oh, we might pump a bit of iron to keep the biceps firm, and we might take some Viagra to keep other things firm, but the light bulb of wellness often does not illuminate until it is too late. Fortunately for John Doe, he got it!

The next important step is Intention. That is, intention to make a change. This step is never easy. It means altering a lifetime of bad habits. Habits that we got away with for
so many years i n our youth, but which then come back to haunt us. Fortunately for John Doe, he clearly saw the light and headed toward it full steam ahead. He started an exercise program, heavy on the cardio. He went on a serious diet appropriate for his condition. We corrected his underlying metabolic and hormonal deficiencies. He started a targeted supplementation plan to correct his nutritional deficiencies, and to provide therapeutic relief from some of his conditions. It was an amazing transformation.

When John arrived back in the office for his follow up visit, I could hardly believe my eyes. He had lost more than 20 pounds, as well as four inches from his waist. He was looking fit and trim and full of energy. He announced that he was feeling fantastic. We sat down to go over his labs and i n every instance there was remarkable improvement. His bad cholesterols were significantly down, and his good cholesterols were up. His markers of inflammation were dramatically improved. His metabolic syndrome had gone away. His vitamin levels were robust. In summary, John Doe was like a new man. He felt better than he had felt for years.

As we dedicate this edition of Natural Awakenings to men, I hope that all men will take hope from Joh n Doe. Just as John Doe turned his illness into wellness and will reap a longer more vibrant life, so too everyman holds within him the potential for greater wellness. We have been given precious gifts of mind, body, and spirit. To reach our full potential, we must nourish and grow these gifts with mindful attention.

Take note of the path that you are on. Are you at a crossroad? With steadfast intention, day by day, and step by step, begin your journey down the path of wellness. You and your loved ones will reap immeasurable and priceless rewards for the rest of your life.

For more information on male health and supplements, visit malehealthreview.com.

This article is meant to educate. It is not intended to diagnose or treat. Anyone with a problem related to the issue discussed in this article should consult a qualified health care provider.

What is Hormone Imbalance? Is it Andropause or Menopause?

andropause

Hormone imbalance is a medical condition that arises when one or more hormones get out of balance with the rest of the hormones. When this occurs in women it is called
menopause. When it occurs in men, it is known as andropause.

The world we live in today is not the same world we had 100 years ago. Today we see many factories producing man-made chemicals at an alarming rate and discharging the waste products into our environment or putting them in our food and water supply. Once these
chemicals are in our environment we are then exposed to them via breathing, drinking contaminated water, or eating foods that contain these chemicals, etc.

Many different chemical products that we come in constant contact with can cause the estrogen to increase in the body. This in turn can result in a compromise of the endocrine system which can lead to a hormonal imbalance. Once these chemicals are in our body, they have the opportunity to do considerable damage to whatever they come into contact with or disrupt.

If we are to understand the origins of hormone imbalance, then we must first examine how age affects the body itself. In a natural progression of aging, normal production of testosterone decreases as we grow older, and the percentage of testosterone vs. estrogen is reduced. Combine that with the exposure to harmful substances in our food and environment, and the estrogen levels begin to increase steadily resulting in a hormonal imbalance in men.

The modern world finds us contsantly exposed to a new type of environmental compound known as xenoestrogens. This particular type of estrogen, generally classified as petrochemicals, posess an extremely powerful estrogen-like effect. These xenoestrogens can be found in the air we breathe, plastic materials, clothing, herbicides and pesticides as well as personal care produtcs. As you can see it is not very difficult in today’s times to be exposed to a number of these chemicals.

Sadly, the modern diet is also polluted with hormones. Synthetic estrogens are now commonly found implemented for the production of larger cattle and other meat-producing animals, as well as to boost egg and milk production. Many of us are eating our way into estrogen dominance as many foods now contain small to large amounts of estrogen. Farmers put estrogens in the foods they feed their livestock. Many birth control pills are not biodegradable and can be found in many of our towns and cities water supply. Synthetic hormones have chemical structures that are not compatible with our bodies and therefore tend to interfere with normal body functions.

lowtestosterone

So what does all of this mean to men when they have too much estrogen? It means that they
are in the male form of menopause, called andropause. Andropause is similar to menopause in women. The difference is that women begin to have a decrease in estrogen and men tend to have an increase in estrogen or a decrease in testosterone. Testosterone does tend to decline
with advancing age which will cause a change in the ratio  of testosterone to estrogen. Andropause finally takes over when the men have a higher level of estrogen than they do
testosterone.

When this condition occurs it can take the form of many different ailments and conditions. It can produce enlarged prostate, low sex drive, impotence, urinary problems, depression, fatigue, foggy thinking, and an unusually rapid increase in weight. Some medical studies have also
linked low testosterone to diabetes as well as an increased risk for having a stroke.

What should any man do that is experiencing any of these conditions? The first step is to make an appointment with a doctor to have your hormone levels checked. This is not quite as easy as it sounds because there are many different ways to check hormones; blood is just one of the
ways. Other tests appear to be more accurate than blood; however, sometimes a combination of different tests is what is needed to find the imbalance.

Once this imbalance has been identified, you then need to be treated to reduce your estrogen levels and increase your testosterone levels. Do not make the mistake of simply taking more testosterone! Why? Because taking more testosterone and not finding out why
your estrogen is elevated is asking for more problems. This is like putting fuel to the fire because your body can convert the increased testosterone into more estrogen.

Your choice of doctors is certainly your decision, so make a wise choice. At Madison Clinic we work with hormones every day. We have different methods of testing your levels, as well as natural treatments to help reverse the problem.

What is Swine Flu?

swine-flu

Ignorance is truly bliss under many circumstances, but when it comes to a person’s health and well-being, knowledge is definitely power.

A case in point is the recent public health scare occurring in response to the swine flu. With the barrage of media attention, it’s easy to get lost among the flurry of information, creating confusion and, ultimately, panic within the population. To lessen fears, it can be useful to understand exactly what makes the influenza virus, something that already affects many people each year, tick.

An Influenza virus invades the cells of a person’s respiratory system in order to accomplish one goal: to multiply, or make more copies of itself. After gaining entry to a cell, the virus hijacks the machinery contained therein, forcing it to make the components necessary for new viruses. When the task is complete, the newly created virus particles burst out of the cell and search for other healthy cells to invade. Its “life” cycle then begins again.

An influenza virus has two components that are needed to enter and then exit a cell. These proteins are called hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, respectively. The scientific terminology for the swine flu virus, H1N1, actually corresponds to the names of these two proteins, and the numbers correspond to particular variants of these proteins. Hence, H1 is hemagglutinin variant 1 and N1 is neuraminidase variant 1 .

There are 16 varieties of hemagglutinin and 9 varieties of neuraminidase, and the combinations of these two constitute different strains of the virus. Some may remember when the world turned its attention to H5N1, or the “bird flu,” only a few short years ago. The virus’s neuraminidase protein has become an effective target for anti-viral drugs such as Tamiflu. Because a virus needs its neuraminidase to leave the cell it invaded, blocking its ability to function keeps the initial virus and all its new copies bound inside the cell instead of being able to leave and prey upon other cells.

Each year, scientists keep a close watch on influenza outbreaks that occur across the country; based upon the information, a prediction is made about which influenza strains are likely to affect the human population during the upcoming flu season that typically occurs from December to March. Vaccines are then tailored to these predicted strains so that the immune system will be armed with protective molecules to recognize and kill a virus in the event of infection.

Flu vaccines are not effective from year to year, however, because the virus mutates continually in an effort to avoid being noticed by the immune system. Influenza type A viruses, which includes 2009 H1N1, have a high rate of mutation and can affect people of all ages, pigs, and birds. In some cultures, it is common for people to live closely among these species, breathing the same air and creating an opportune environment for the influenza subtype A viruses to be passed between each other. These conditions, combined with the propensity of the virus to mutate, facilitate the evolution of a strain such as H1N1 that is problematic because it spreads easily from person to person, people do not have immunity to it, and there is not yet a vaccine.