Guidelines To A Better Sleep For You And Your Child


Sleep is the utmost human requirement, but it is often the neglected and least cared about necessity of human life. Not just humans, but animals too require a good sleep to allow their bodies to function properly. But for humans, lack of sleep can lead to quite adverse affects on their health.

We all live a very hectic life in this current high-tech generation, where all our day’s chores are either devoted to work or unhealthy activities. Thus, it is quite obvious that sleep is ignored as we want to do more and more things while we are awake. It is a thoroughly established fact that adults should take at least 7 to 8 hours of sleep, but on the contrary we sleep merely 5 to 6 hours, which causes numerous ill affects on our metabolism, leading to several ailments like; diabetes and heart diseases.

The same goes for children who on average should sleep 9 to 12 hours a day, depending upon age. However, they either sleep more, or quite less then the prescribed. Thus it is important that both you and your children follow a perfect sleeping guide, so that you don’t put yourself and your child under any risk, when it comes to health.

Sleep Regression In Babies

There are certain things to ponder over regarding you children’s sleep, especially if you have just got a new little angel at your home. These things are not just about sleep hours, but about sleep cycle as well. Babies tend to develop certain habits like the well established fact of sleep regression among babies and require appropriate look after.

New born babies are required to sleep at least 18 hours a day; this isn’t a continuous sleep as they have to wake up to for food. But when the new born reaches an age of 4 months, he tends to deviate from his sleeping pattern. As a result the baby starts to wake up more often, and you might thing that he may be asking for food, but in reality he is just trying to adjust his sleep. This is termed as 4 months sleep regression in babies and is one of the toughest tests for parents after the baby is born.

However, when the baby starts to grow right before your eyes and enters his child hood you have to understand his requirements and how can he affectively maintain a good sleep routine, so that it might benefit him when he grows old.

Sleep Apparel For Children

It is essential that you recognize the sleep related requirement of your child. He should be provided a perfect cozy environment so that he could affectively sleep during the night. Hence, you should make sure that you buy comfortable sleepwear for kids like; pajamas and nightshirts. These clothing should be of good and comfortable fabric like cotton.

A part from these necessary things you should provide to you child, it is also necessary to make sure he develops a habit of changing his clothes before sleeping. Also he should brush his teeth and empty his bladder to get a nice and comfy sleep.

But all these efforts that you are making in trying to develop healthy habits among your children should not make you neglect yourself. As if you are healthy, so will be your child; and definitely this health can only come, if you too get a complete sleep. So, here are some quick tips.

Sleeping Tips For Adults – Healthy Diet

Being an adult specially a parent is the most difficult phase of life as a lot of worries surround us through out the day regarding; work, children and the future. However, it is wisely said, “Don’t take your worries to your bed” as all you will get is sleep deprivation, which could lead to all sorts of problems.

Thus, avoid being worried while you are going to sleep, just try to be happy and content in life. However, if you still don’t find yourself sleeping then you can change your eating habits and diet for a good sleep.

A good way to do this is to avoid excessive caffeine products like; tea, coffee, chocolates and fizzy drinks. These are the biggest culprit to sleep deprivation in our lives.

You should try not to over eat during the night as this can give you a bloated feeling when on bed. Keeping this in view, also try not to take useless snacks before sleeping, instead drink a hot cup of milk but make sure you have taken dinner atleast 3 hours before your sleep. This will relax you a bit and induce sleep.

Your Body Has a New Organ

There’s a new family member in the digestive system – the mesentery. Although only just now being classified as an organ, it’s been part of the human body for millennia. It’s taken a long time, but finally the mesentery is taking it’s rightful place among the other digestive organs.

Hard Facts on Salt

salt

Salt. We add it to practically everything we eat and it’s in nearly every processed food out there. A little salt is needed in the body to help maintain the fluid in our cells. Salt actually assists in the absorption of water into our cells; that is why ingesting too much salt can cause oedema, or swelling.

According to the Better Health Channel (www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au) people average more than double their recommended daily intake of salt. It is suggested that you only have up to 4 grams per day, with 6 grams still being acceptable.

Although you may assume cutting back on the amount of salt you put into and onto your food would be the best way to cut back, you actually get 75% of the salt you ingest, from processed foods; white bread being one of the largest contributors.

Also on the list of processed foods to avoid are:

  • Pizza
  • Potato chips
  • Processed meats like sausages, hot dogs and salami
  • Canned veggies
  • Instant soups and pastas
  • Pre-packaged condiments like teriyaki, soy and tomato sauce

I know what you’re thinking; this looks like your grocery list. But it isn’t all bad; in addition to cutting back on the salt you physically add, eating fresh veggies instead of canned, eating whole-wheat or multi-grain bread and limiting how often and how much you use certain condiments, are all ways to take your salt level down to a healthy level.

A common misconception is that the popular sea salt is the safe alternative. The truth is that sea salt actually contains 98% sodium chloride where regular table salt contains 97.5% sodium chloride. The problem lies in the salt refining process. Sea salt and table salt both go through the exact same refining process which removes 82 of the 84 minerals found in sea water.

In fact, refining salt is not done primarily to create salt for commercial use, but rather industrial. According to www.leaflady.org, “only 7% of the salt that is manufactured goes for food”. The rest is used in making everything from fertilizers to plastics and explosives.

A healthy alternative to use is something called Celtic sea salt. Unlike regular salt, this salt is completely unrefined and has all 84 elements still intact due to a process of sun and air drying.

Some of the health conditions related to high salt intake are: heart failure; kidney problems; gastric and stomach cancer; stroke; and osteoporosis.

But probably the most common ailment associated with excessive salt intake is high blood pressure. Normally in your body, any surplus salt is simply passed into the urine. But when there are large amounts, the kidneys can’t keep up and it then gets dumped into our bloodstream. Since salt and water (which is brought into our blood via the salt) are attracted to each other, more and more water is brought into the bloodstream which then results in high blood pressure.

Some tips in reducing your daily intake of salt are:

  • Choose fresh vegetables over canned
  • Avoid adding salt while cooking or at the table
  • Cut back on processed foods and make a habit of reading labels
  • Cut out fast food which is usually high in salt and processed
  • Use things like fresh garlic, onion and other spices to season instead of salt
  • Choose reduced salt items at the grocery whenever possible

Although virtually impossible to eradicate from your diet, salt, in healthy amounts is actually necessary to our bodies. Putting the shaker down and making healthier, salt-reduced choices can make a dramatic difference to our overall health.

Types Of Growth Media

agar

A growth or culture media is is used for the growth of certain microorganism for their study and research on them. The microorganism need suitable environment for them too flourish.

The different growth medium provide them those conditions but external physical factors should also be right for a microorganisms to grow. The growth medium actually provides the microorganism nutrients so that they can live.

Depending on the type of microorganism, the right type of culture medium has to be chosen, culture medium can be either liquid or solid. Solid culture media is a jelly like substance.

This jelly like substance is called “agar”. Normally such plates on which microorganism are grown are called agar plates. Here are the names of some commonly used laboratory culture medium.

1. The Preservation Culture Media
2. The Enrichment Culture Media
3. Selective Culture Media
4. Differential Culture Media
5. Resuscitation Culture Media
6. General Purpose Media
7. Isolation Culture Media
8. Fermentation Media

Are there limits to what evolution can produce?

evolutionary_biology

Evolution has produced some exquisite examples of biological machinery, from bat echolocation to the human brain. But are there things that cannot ever evolve? And why?

To answer this question, we first need to understand a couple of things. The first is that natural selection is about preserving what works, not what is in principle the best “design” for something. We can envisage more efficient designs than those found in nature, but given that evolution is a population phenomenon that compares how well contemporaries do against one another, it will favour those designs that happen to work best, even if they are shoddy solutions (relative to a universal optima that we can imagine) to a problem.

Secondly (and related to this first point), is that what gets selected has to be built upon what’s already there. This means that selection will result in things that are ad hoc and convoluted. As Richard Dawkins has said about the laryngeal nerve (a nerve that exists in the pharynx or throat region of vertebrates), it is easy to imagine a more efficient, less resource-wasting design that has the nerve pass straight through the pharynx rather than under it and back up again, but the cost in embryological upheaval of such a change would likely be prohibitive because of the negative effects on other morphological arrangements as a side-consequence. The intermediates would never be selected for, and hence the less efficient, sub-optimal version is what gets preserved. Of course, it needn’t have been so if organisms had been designed afresh by a deity or some other intelligent agent. What we actually see, though, are solutions to life’s problems that clearly show the imprint left behind by history, because the solutions are often a patchwork of prior solutions that are “stuck” at local rather than universal (effectively imaginary) optima. Organisms carry, as Charles Darwin said of human beings (the most exalted of all organisms), the indelible stamp of their origins.

There will probably never be cheetahs pursuing gazelles on the African savannah at Mach 2.0. There will probably never be sharks that fire torpedoes at seals. There will probably never be birds with electronic radar. But we can find analogues of these; we find fish that spit water at insects to knock them out, and tarantulas that shoot hairs at adversaries. We find bats that use sound waves to determine the location of prey, and dolphins that use sonar to find food hiding beneath the sea bed. Natural selection is all about the allocation of resources in direct proportion to the suite of demands imposed by the environment that is pertinent to the organism in question – the ease of acquiring nutrients, the ease of finding a mate, the risk of being predated upon, abiotic factors like temperature, and so on. All these factors impose selection pressures of their own – often in opposition to other pressures – and what results will normally be a compromise between them, a design that represents a solution to the average set of pressures in an environment over a period of time. There will be a lot of historical baggage that will be dragged along, and if there are no efficient means of getting rid of it, it must be tolerated, as it were.

Lineages can change in dramatic ways, but there are definite limits on what evolution can do, defined, first of all, by the laws of chemistry and physics, and by the immediate needs of the organisms that comprise populations.

Hormone Replacement Therapy and Menopause

Some women choose to begin hormone replacement therapy after the symptoms of menopause begin. This therapy can reduce the strength and number of hot flashes that occur. Many hormone replacement therapies replace the loss of estrogen. The production of the hormones progesterone and testosterone are also affected by menopause.

While the female ovaries will no longer create progesterone, the adrenal gland will often continue making testosterone though the levels may be lower than before the onset of menopause and thus the change in sexual desire and vaginal moisture. Bone reduction begins soon after menopause begins due to the relationship between the female hormones and bone production.

Estrogen hormone replacement therapy is prescribed on an as needed basis. Some women choose to naturally enter into menopause and never supplement with artificial or synthetic hormones. Others, especially those who have surgically induced menopause and osteoporosis or osteopenia, will choose hormone replacement therapy.

Testosterone replacement therapy can also be a part of post menopausal therapy. This replacement is a bit more complicated than estrogen replacement therapy. In order to supplement testosterone, the woman will need to undergo testosterone level tests before therapy and during therapy to ensure the levels are not too high or too low.

As an alternative to estrogen replacement, many women are find relief in the form of an all-natural herbal female libido supplement, which may help to restore hormonal balance and assist in alleviating many of the symptoms they experience.

 

FDA Approves Cefaly, First Device For Migraine Prevention

So, I did write about this device awhile ago and I wondered how long it would take to be approved by the FDA in the U.S. Well, they just approved it.
The FDA said in a statement:

“The user positions the device in the center of the forehead, just above the eyes, using a self-adhesive electrode,” the agency explained. “The device applies an electric current to the skin and underlying body tissues to stimulate branches of the trigeminal nerve, which has been associated with migraine headaches.”

“This device is a promising step forward in treating migraine headaches, as it addresses an important part of what we believe triggers and maintains a migraine attack,” said Dr. Myrna Cardiel, a clinical associate professor of neurology at NYU Langone Medical Center and NYU School of Medicine in New York City.

Now, I am looking online right now, there are a few places to purchase it,one needed a prescription. The best thing to do would be to talk to your doctor about it. I have no idea, since it is so new, if it will be covered under insurance.

Since it is newly approved in the U.S. I imagine supplies will run low. I plan on getting one, I will be talking to my doctor. These are not cheap, they run from $250-349. Now, there are also Elecotrloads sold in packs of 3 for about $25.00.According to one of the sites that sells them, celafy.us each Electrode lasts 20 times, it adheres the device to your forehead.

Here is the link on the FDA approval.

I am posting two links that sell them, just to give you the information, the first does not require a prescription, the second one does. Keep in mind, I am sure there are more sites.

Gastric Bypass: An Overiew of Bariatric Surgery

gastric-bypass

Gastric bypass, or bariatric surgery, is quickly becoming the most popular weight loss tool in America. This form of weight loss is very risky.

No one can hide from seeing or hearing about personal accounts of gastric bypass success. For those who have had the surgery and were successful in losing a significant amount of weight, their stories can be a convincing advertisement for the procedure. But there are a lot of risks when a person undergoes gastric bypass surgery, and anyone thinking about getting the procedure should know who qualifies for the surgery and how this can affect the rest of someone’s life.

The first step in learning more about gastric bypass surgery is to contact a doctor that specializes in the procedure. Many people make the mistake of going to a professional who is not qualified or skilled in the procedure, and this could raise the rate of complications. In order to get a safe, reliable surgery with a low risk of complications, research the doctor who will be doing the procedure. Make sure the doctor is skilled in this type of medicine and that he is committed to successful results.

The Effect On Your Life

Before approaching a doctor, one must think about how gastric bypass surgery will change one’s life. Getting gastric bypass surgery is just one step in many in order to change not only the weight of a person, but the lifestyle choices of a person. Gastric bypass surgery requires that a person must meet physical requirements for surgery as well as the determination to change his life.
First, anyone who is thinking about gastric bypass surgery will have to undergo a physical exam. This exam might be a little different for everyone, depending on the risk factors of the person. Heart health, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels will all play a factor in whether someone qualifies to get gastric bypass surgery.

The Necessity of Strict Diet and Exercise

Those who are thinking about getting this procedure will also need to make lifestyle changes that are not just to get the surgery and give the body time to heal, but permanent changes that will affect the rest of their lives. There must be a strict diet and exercise program set up in order to let those who have had gastric bypass surgery live a healthier life. These issues are some of the most important factors in determining whether someone qualifies for gastric bypass surgery. If a person cannot handle changes in diet and exercise, then gastric bypass surgery may not be the right choice.

Those who are thinking about gastric bypass surgery should think carefully about the affects this will have on their life and the lives of those around them. A doctor also needs to be consulted so that the doctor can provide the patient with more information about the benefits, risks, and overall changes that will happen with gastric bypass surgery.
Cost may also be factor when a person determines whether gastric bypass surgery is right for him or not. Many insurance companies will not pay for the surgery unless the doctor can provide proof that this is a necessary procedure in order to reduce medical risk factors.

What is a Consumer Confidence Report?

drinking-water

The 1996 Amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act implemented the Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) rule. The CCR rule required all community water systems to issue annual drinking water quality reports to their consumers by July 1st of each year.

A CCR is required to include all of the following:

  • The lake, river, aquifer or other source of your drinking water
  • A brief summary of the pollution threats to the sources of your drinking water based on investigations called “source water assessments.” All states must have their source water assessments completed by May 2003.
  • Information on how to get a copy of the water company’s “source water assessment” or any “sanitary surveys” that have already been done
    1. Sanitary surveys are carried out to evaluate: (1) the capability of a drinking water system to consistently and reliably deliver an adequate quality and quantity of safe drinking water to the consumer, and (2) the system’s compliance with federal drinking water regulations.
  • The level or range of levels of certain contaminants found in local drinking water, as well as EPA’s enforceable standard MCL (maximum contaminant level), and health-based goal MCLG, (maximum contaminant level goal).
    1. The maximum contaminant level is the greatest level of contaminants allowed in water that is delivered to anyone using the public water system. Exceedances of MCLs are considered violations under the Safe Drinking Water Act.
    2. The maximum contaminant level goal is a non-enforceable concentration of a drinking water contaminant protects human health. These numbers, allowing for an adequate margin of safety, are considered to be target levels to assure no adverse effects on human health.
  • The likely point source and/or non-point source of pollution or the category of pollution for that contaminant in the water supply.
  • The likelihood of adverse health conditions from any contaminant detected in violation of an EPA standard and documentation of actions taken to restore safe drinking water.
  • The water system’s compliance with other drinking water-related rules.
  • A statement for vulnerable people about avoiding the parasite Cryptosporidium because it is thought to be present in so many drinking water sources.
    1. Cryptosporidium is a parasite that is recognized as one of the most common causes of waterborne disease (drinking and recreational) in humans in the United States. Sources of contamination include human and fecal waste. Symptoms of the illness include diarrhea, loose or watery stools, stomach cramps, upset stomach, and a slight fever.
  • Information on the health effects of nitrate, arsenic, lead or trihalomethanes when these contaminants are found at levels above half of EPA’s standard.
    1. Nitrate is an inorganic chemical that may contaminate water by being leached from septic tanks, sewage and natural deposit erosion, as well as fertilizer use. Excess nitrate can cause “blue baby syndrome” in infants less than six months.
    2. Arsenic is an inorganic chemical that contaminates water through erosion of natural deposits and runoff from glass and electronics production wastes. Exposure to excessive levels of arsenic can cause skin damage, circulatory problems, and increased risk of cancer.
    3. Lead is a chemical that contaminates water through corrosion of household plumbing systems, and erosion of natural deposits. Exposure to lead among infants and children can result in delays in physical or mental development. Exposure to excessive levels of lead among adults can cause kidney problems and high blood pressure.
    4. Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs) are by-products of drinking water disinfections. Exposure to TTHMs can cause liver, kidney, and central nervous system problems, an increased risk of cancer, miscarriages and birth defects.
  • Phone numbers of additional sources of information including the water system and the US Environmental Protection Agency.
  • Information on how an individual can find out about public meetings where decisions about your water are being made.
*Campaign for Safe & Affordable Drinking Water, Making Sense Out of Drinking Water “Right to Know Reports,” Fall 1999.