Nice Legs. Who owns them?

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You may be wondering whose owns these legs, and why they’re clad in little red and white ribbons. I was wondering that myself, as I was leafing through this week’s American Medical News. It turns out that they belong to television host Meredith Vieira, who apparently rented them to the pharmaceutical giant Sanofi Aventis. Sanofi, it turns out, happens to make enoxaparin, also known as Lovenox® – a low-molecular weight heparin. Meredith and Sanofi have been co-promoting a DVT (deep vein thrombosis) awareness campaign on NBC and MSNBC. To be fair, if any multinational conglomerate television network is going to have a reason to publicize DVT, it’s NBC. Remember that they lost one of their reporters – David Bloom – to a DVT. In any case, it turns out that someone has designated March as “DVT Awareness Month”. Well, not just somone. Brian Dorgan (D-ND) and Arlen Specter (R-PA) managed to pass Senate Resolution 56 on March 2, 2005, which I guess makes it official. Sanofi-Aventis funds an organization called Coalition to Prevent DVT which is driving the current advertising campaign and the DVT awareness month.

Fancy that.In a way, this is clearly a worthwhile effort. As part of my training, I’ve done quite a bit of pediatric hematology and have seen my fair share of deep vein thromboses. I’ve also seen enough pulmonary emboli to make me fear them, and enough venous stasis disease to recognize that the damage done by DVTs is more than just a clot or an embolus. That being said, I am a little uncomfortable that the company that makes one of the main medications for the treatment of DVTs and PEs has co-opted a public figure into doing their advertising. There’s been a huge push to have the relationship between pharmaceutical companies and physicians stripped to is most minimal connection, or severed altogether. People worry that a click pen or pad of PostIt notes will unduly influence physician prescribing habits. Fine. I prefer by non-branded pens and sticky notes anyway.

But I can tell you this: Meredith Vieira reaches 10,000 or 100,000 or 1,000,000 times as many people per day as I do, and going by absolute numbers of people influenced, she clearly wins. However, I don’t see anyone questioning her relationship with a pharmaceutical company. If Sanofi wanted to fly her to meetings and put her up in a nice hotel, I doubt we’d hear people criticizing her objectivity. But have a drug rep a group of starving residents a pizza to get them through a 30-hour shift and stop the presses … we have physicians being corrupted by industry. Thoughts?